Bee Stings – Diagnosis and Treatment

bee stings

Treating bee and wasp stings depends on their severity. The majority of problems that require medical attention come from an allergic reaction to the sting. In most cases, complications from that reaction respond well to medications — when given in time.

PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE

The statement above is 100% TRUE! Here are 10 techniques to Reduce the Risk of Being Stung

  1. Wear light-colored, smooth-finished clothing.
  2. Avoid perfumed soaps, shampoos, and deodorants. Don’t wear cologne or perfume. Avoid bananas and banana-scented toiletries.
  3. Wear clean clothing and bathe daily. Sweat angers bees.
  4. Cover the body as much as possible with clothing.
  5. Avoid flowering plants.
  6. Check for new nests during the warmer hours of the day during July, August and September. Bees are very active then.
  7. Keep areas clean. Social wasps thrive in places where humans discard food, so clean up picnic tables, grills and other outdoor eating areas.
  8. If a single stinging insect is flying around, remain still or lie face down on the ground. The face is the most likely place for a bee or wasp to sting. Swinging or swatting at an insect may cause it to sting.
  9. If you are attacked by several stinging insects at the same time, run to get away from them. Bees release a chemical when they sting. This alerts other bees to the intruder. More bees often follow. If possible, get indoors when there are a few, if any, bees around you. Outdoors, a shaded area is better than an open area to get away from the insects.
  10. If a bee comes inside your vehicle, stop the car slowly, and open all the windows.
Home Treatment for Bee Stings

Most insects stings for someone who is not allergic need no more than first aid given at home. Then you can avoid further stings by wearing protective clothing, using insect repellent, and staying out of infested areas.

Here are the steps you need to take after someone who is allergic has been stung:

  • Remove any stingers right away. They have venom and will release it for several seconds after it goes in.
  • Have someone stay with the victim to be sure that they do not have an allergic reaction.
  • Taking an antihistamine such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl) or a nonsedating one such as loratadine (Claritin) will help with itching and swelling.
  • Take acetaminophen (Tylenol) or ibuprofen (Motrin)for pain relief as needed.
  • Wash the sting site with soap and water. Placing hydrocortisone cream on the sting can help relieve redness, itching, and swelling.
  • If it’s been more than 10 years since your last tetanus booster, get a booster within the next few days.
  • Most insect stings require no additional medical care.
  • Applying ice to the site may provide some mild relief. Apply ice for 20 minutes once every hour as needed. Wrap the ice in a towel or keep a cloth between the ice and skin to keep from freezing the skin.

Please note that regular First Aid and CPR Training is the best way to make sure that you’re prepare in the case of an emergency.

Book CPR and First Aid Training in Tullamarine, north west of Melbourne or we can come to your location. 10% off for a group of 10 or more!


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